Planet HantsLUG

November 23, 2014

Adam Trickett

November 22, 2014

Steve Kemp

Lumail 2.x ?

I've continued to ponder the idea of reimplementing the console mail-client I wrote, lumail, using a more object-based codebase.

For one thing having loosely coupled code would allow testing things in isolation, which is clearly a good thing.

I've written some proof of concept code which will allow the following Lua to be evaluated:

-- Open the maildir.
users = Maildir.new( "/home/skx/Maildir/.debian.user" )

-- Count the messages.
print( "There are " .. users:count() .. " messages in the maildir " .. users:path() )

--
-- Now we want to get all the messages and output their paths.
--
for k,v in ipairs( users:messages()) do
    --
    -- Here we could do something like:
    --
    --   if ( string.find( v:headers["subject"], "troll", 1, true ) ) then v:delete()  end
    --
    -- Instead play-nice and just show the path.
    print( k .. " -> " .. v:path() )
end

This is all a bit ugly, but I've butchered some code together that works, and tried to solicit feedback from lumail users.

I'd write more but I'm tired, and intending to drink whisky and have an early night. Today I mostly replaced pipes in my attic. (Is it "attic", or is it "loft"? I keep alternating!) Fingers crossed this will mean a dry kitchen in the morning.

November 22, 2014 09:39 PM

November 21, 2014

Adam Trickett

November 20, 2014

Steve Kemp

An experiment in (re)building Debian

I've rebuilt many Debian packages over the years, largely to fix bugs which affected me, or to add features which didn't make the cut in various releases. For example I made a package of fabric available for Wheezy, since it wasn't in the release. (Happily in that case a wheezy-backport became available. Similar cases involved repackaging gtk-gnutella when the protocol changed and the official package in the lenny release no longer worked.)

I generally release a lot of my own software as Debian packages, although I'll admit I've started switching to publishing Perl-based projects on CPAN instead - from which they can be debianized via dh-make-perl.

One thing I've not done for many years is a mass-rebuild of Debian packages. I did that once upon a time when I was trying to push for the stack-smashing-protection inclusion all the way back in 2006.

Having had a few interesting emails this past week I decided to do the job for real. I picked a random server of mine, rsync.io, which stores backups, and decided to rebuild it using "my own" packages.

The host has about 300 packages installed upon it:

root@rsync ~ # dpkg --list | grep ^ii | wc -l
294

I got the source to every package, patched the changelog to bump the version, and rebuild every package from source. That took about three hours.

Every package has a "skx1" suffix now, and all the build-dependencies were also determined by magic and rebuilt:

root@rsync ~ # dpkg --list | grep ^ii | awk '{ print $2 " " $3}'| head -n 4
acpi 1.6-1skx1
acpi-support-base 0.140-5+deb7u3skx1
acpid 1:2.0.16-1+deb7u1skx1
adduser 3.113+nmu3skx1

The process was pretty quick once I started getting more and more of the packages built. The only shortcut was not explicitly updating the dependencies to rely upon my updages. For example bash has a Debian control file that contains:

Depends: base-files (>= 2.1.12), debianutils (>= 2.15)

That should have been updated to say:

Depends: base-files (>= 2.1.12skx1), debianutils (>= 2.15skx1)

However I didn't do that, because I suspect if I did want to do this decently, and I wanted to share the source-trees, and the generated packages, the way to go would not be messing about with Debian versions instead I'd create a new Debian release "alpha-apple", "beta-bananna", "crunchy-carrot", "dying-dragonfruit", "easy-elderberry", or similar.

In conclusion: Importing Debian packages into git, much like Ubuntu did with bzr, is a fun project, and it doesn't take much to mass-rebuild if you're not making huge changes. Whether it is worth doing is an entirely different question of course.

November 20, 2014 01:28 PM

Adam Trickett

November 19, 2014

Alan Pope

Scopes Contest Mid-way Roundup

I recently blogged about my Ubuntu Scopes Contest Wishlist after we kicked off the Scopes Development Competition where Ubuntu Phone Scope developers can be in with a chance of winning cool devices and swag. See the above links for more details.

As a judge on that contest I’ve been keeping an eye out for interesting scopes that are under development for the competition. As we’re at the half way point in the contest I thought I’d mention a few. Of course me mentioning them here doesn’t mean they’re favourites or winners, I’m just raising awareness of the competition and hopefully helping to inspire more people to get involved.

Developers have until 3rd December to complete their entry to be in with a chance of winning a laptop, tablet and other cool stuff. We’ll accept new scopes in the Ubuntu Click Store at any time though :)

Robert Schroll is working on a GMail scope giving fast access to email.

gmail

Bogdan Cuza is developing a Mixcloud scope making it easy to search for cool songs and remixes.

Screenshot from 2014-11-10 18:57:32

Sam Segers has a Google Places scope making it easy to find local businesses.

Places-scope002

Michael Weimann has been working on a Nearby Scope and has been blogging about his progress.

Main

Dan has also been blogging about the Cinema Scope.

img2

Finally Riccardo Padovani has been posting screenshots of his Duck Duck Go Scope which is already in the click store.

divergentduck

I’m sure there there are other scopes I’ve missed. Feel free to link to them in the comments. It’s incredibly exciting for me to see early adopter developers embracing our fast-moving platform to realise their ideas.

Good luck to everyone entering the contest.

by popey at November 19, 2014 12:03 PM

Adam Trickett

November 18, 2014

Andy Smith

Paranoid, Init

Having marvelled at the er… unique nature of MikeeUSA’s Systemd Blues: Took our thing (Wooo) blues homage to the perils of using systemd, I decided what the world actually needs is something from the metal genre.

So, here’s the lyrics to Paranoid, Init.

Default soon on Debian
This doesn’t help me with my mind
People think I’m insane
Because I am trolling all the time

All day long I fight Red Hat
And uphold UNIX philosophy
Think I’ll lose my mind
If I can’t use sysvinit on jessie

Can you help me
Terrorise pid 1?
Oh yeah!

Tried to show the committee
That things were wrong with this design
They can’t see Poettering’s plan in this
They must be blind

Some sick joke I could just cry
GNOME needs logind API
QR codes gave me a feel
Then binary logs just broke the deal

And so as you hear these words
Telling you now of my state
Can’t log off and enjoy life
I’ve another sock puppet to create

by Andy at November 18, 2014 11:00 AM

Adam Trickett

November 17, 2014

Adam Trickett

November 15, 2014

Adam Trickett

November 14, 2014

Adam Trickett

November 13, 2014

Debian Bits

DebConf15 welcomes its first nine sponsors!

DebConf15 will take place in Heidelberg, Germany in August 2015. We strive to provide an intense working environment and enable good progress for Debian and for Free Software in general. We extend an invitation to everyone to join us and to support this event. As a volunteer-run non-profit conference, we depend on our sponsors.

Nine companies have already committed to sponsor DebConf15! Let's introduce them:

Our first Gold sponsor is credativ, a service-oriented company focusing on open-source software, and also a Debian development partner.

Our second Gold sponsor is sipgate, a Voice over IP service provider based in Germany that also operates in the United Kingdom (sipgate site in English).

Google (the search engine and advertising company), Fairsight Security, Inc. (developers of real-time passive DNS solutions), Martin Alfke / Buero 2.0 (Linux & UNIX Consultant and Trainer, LPIC-2/Puppet Certified Professional) and Ubuntu (the OS supported by Canonical) are our three Silver sponsors.

And last but not least, Logilab, Netways and Hetzner have agreed to support us as Bronze-level.

Become a sponsor too!

Would you like to become a sponsor? Do you know of or work in a company or organization that may consider sponsorship?

Please have a look at our sponsorship brochure (also available in German), in which we outline all the details and describe the sponsor benefits. For instance, sponsors have the option to reach out to Debian contributors, derivative developers, upstream authors and other community members during a Job Fair and through postings on our job wall, and to show-case their Free Software involvement by staffing a booth on the Open Weekend. In addition, sponsors are able to distribute marketing materials in the attendee bags. And it goes without saying that we honour your sponsorship with visibility of your logo in the conference's videos, on our website, on printed materials, and banners.

The final report of DebConf14 is also available, illustrating the broad spectrum, quality, and enthusiasm of the community at work, and providing detailed information about the different outcomes that last conference brought up (talks, participants, social events, impact in the Debian project and the free software scene, and much more).

For further details, feel free to contact us through sponsors@debconf.org, and visit the DebConf15 website at http://debconf15.debconf.org.

by Laura Arjona Reina at November 13, 2014 01:35 PM

Adam Trickett

November 12, 2014

Adam Trickett